Photo of Michael C. Ksiazek

Mike Ksiazek is a Shareholder and member Stark & Stark’s Accident & Personal Injury Department. Mike concentrates his practice on catastrophic injury and wrongful death claims, including those caused by medical malpractice, premises liability and products liability. Mike has litigated complex cases throughout Pennsylvania and New Jersey in both state and federal courts.

A recent study by a team of vehicle experts at the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Volpe Center found that pedestrian crash avoidance/mitigation (PCAM) systems can potentially reduce up to 5,000 vehicle-pedestrian crashes and 810 fatal vehicle-pedestrian crashes each year. Even if a crash is unavoidable, PCAM systems may reduce the resulting number of injured pedestrians by lowering the speed of the vehicle prior to impact.

It only takes a momentary distraction to cause a motor vehicle/pedestrian collision. That distraction may be on the part of the driver of the vehicle or the pedestrian, or a combination of the two. A driver may be distracted by children in the car or a ringing cell phone, or by changing the music that is playing. A pedestrian may be looking at his or her cell phone, talking to others, or even reading while walking. But whatever the cause or causes, the pedestrian is by far the most likely to be injured or killed as a result of the impact.


Continue Reading Do Pedestrian Detection Systems in Cars Save Lives?

In Pennsylvania, a medical malpractice lawsuit must be filed in the county where the alleged malpractice occurred.

The Superior Court in Pennsylvania recently reversed a trial court decision in a medical malpractice case that transferred venue from Philadelphia County to Berks County, sending the case back to Philadelphia County.

The case involved a premature infant who was being treated in the neonatal intensive care unit in a Berks County hospital. The infant underwent a transthoracic echocardiogram in Berks County, which was interpreted by a pediatric cardiologist working in a hospital in Philadelphia County. The Philadelphia cardiologist wrote a report of her findings, including her diagnosis and treatment plan. The diagnosis of the Philadelphia doctor was pulmonary hypertension requiring immediate treatment or intervention, which was to be forwarded to plaintiff’s treating providers in Berks County.


Continue Reading Venue Returned to County Where Failure to Communicate Medical Test Results Occurred

A physician cannot perform a surgery or other medical procedure on a patient without first obtaining the patient’s informed consent. Informed consent means that the patient was advised of the risks, benefits, and alternatives to the procedure and, knowing these, made the decision to undergo the procedure. A physician can be legally liable where he or she fails to obtain a patient’s informed consent before performing a medical procedure.

In a recent medical malpractice action, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court held that a physician’s duty to provide information to a patient sufficient to obtain her informed consent is non-delegable. Thus, conversations between the patient and members of the physician’s staff will not suffice. The duty to obtain a patient’s informed consent for a major medical procedure belongs to the physician, who must inform the patient about the risks, benefits, likelihood of success, and alternatives.


Continue Reading Can a Doctor Delegate Duty to Obtain Informed Consent to Staff Member?

As reported by philly.com, New Jersey Department of Health investigators have released a preliminary report finding that that the Osteo Relief Institute Jersey Shore in Wall Township deviated from multiple infection control guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.

The report indicates that the clinic’s disregard of accepted hygiene practices likely

The Pennsylvania Superior Court will reconsider its ruling that attorney-client privilege does not apply to an email from a hospital’s attorney to its public relations firm.

The discovery dispute in the case involved a document generated by outside counsel pertaining to a public announcement planned by the hospital. The announcement would name two doctors who were identified from the results of a cardiology services audit as having performed unnecessary cardiac stent procedures. The hospital claimed that the audit indicated that the blockages in the patients at issue were so minimal that stents were not medically appropriate.


Continue Reading Pennsylvania Court to Reconsider Denial of Attorney-Client Privilege for Email to Consultant

According to the March of Dimes, each year more than 12,000 newborns are identified as having a condition detected through newborn screening. Newborn screening is the practice of testing every newborn for certain genetic, metabolic, hormonal, and functional conditions. If diagnosed early, many of these conditions can be successfully managed, improving lives and reducing costs. If not diagnosed, or not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner, these conditions can cause severe disability or death.

Newborn Screening in the US

Through newborn screening, nearly every baby in the United States is tested for genetic disorders shortly after birth. Health care providers collect blood samples from newborns and send them to labs for testing. But a recent report issued by the U.S. Government Accountability Office found most states have not met federal benchmarks to screen 95 percent of blood samples within seven days of birth by 2017.
Continue Reading Do We Need More Uniformity in Newborn Screening in the US?

On March 3, 2017, a bill that would require medical malpractice claims to be reviewed by expert advisory panels before proceeding to court won final passage in the Kentucky Senate, two days after it narrowly passed in the House of Representatives. The bill will now be sent to Gov. Matt Bevin.

Continue Reading Bill Creating Medical Malpractice Panels Passes in Kentucky

A recent BMJ (British Medical Journal) study listed medical errors as the third leading cause of death in the United States. The BMJ recommends that healthcare providers make prevention of patient harm the top healthcare priority and institute policy and procedure changes directed toward that objective.

The study points out that the medical cause of an injury or death on the death certificate doesn’t reflect that “communication breakdowns, diagnostic errors, poor judgment, and inadequate skill can directly result in patient harm and death.”


Continue Reading Preventing Harm to Patients should be Priority #1 for Healthcare Providers

For those unaware, a “hospitalist” is a physician who works exclusively in a hospital setting and specializes in Hospital Medicine. Most commonly, hospitalists undergo residency training in Internal Medicine or Family Medicine and, therefore, have education and training similar to doctors practicing as primary care physicians or family doctors.

However, some hospitalists have training in other medical specialties, and some hospitalists do undergo hospital-focused post-residency training, such as a fellowship in Hospital Medicine. Because they work in hospital settings, hospitalists frequently have to manage acutely ill and hospitalized patients. Often their role involves coordinating the treatment of the various physician specialists involved in a patient’s care while they are hospitalized. A hospitalist, in a sense, can serve as a patient’s primary care physician while the patient is in the hospital.


Continue Reading Understanding Hospitalist Malpractice Claims