With the summer right around the corner, many people will be  flocking to the ocean, lakes and rivers. Here are five tips for boaters to help keep our waterways safe.

  1. Do not approach any military, cruise line or commercial shipping vessels. The Naval Vessel Protection Zone requires boaters not to approach within 100 yards and

With the summer officially underway and many people, adults and children, will be on the roads on bicycles. Riding a bicycle is great exercise and help to the environment. However, given the number of car on the road it is imperative to understand safe protocol while sharing the roads with cars. Here are ten tips for bicyclists to keep safe on the roads.
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The United States Department of Transportation through the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration regulates the hours of services for drivers. Specifically, the regulations states

(1) Driver may drive 11 hours after 10 hour off duty

(2) Driver may not drive beyond the 14th hour after coming on duty, following 10 hours off duty; and

(3) Driver may not drive after 60/70 hours on-duty in 7/8 consecutive days.
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A pre-trip inspection by a driver of tractor trailer is required by Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. A pre-trip inspection should be done to ensure the tractor trail is operating safely and there are no problems with the tractor trailer. Prior to operating the vehicle, a Driver Vehicle Inspection Report should be filled out and signed by the driver. If there are defects, those defects need to be immediately addressed by a mechanic and mechanic is required to sign and verify the Inspection Report.
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Caveat Emptor is Latin for “Let the Buyer Beware” and consumers should be careful when selecting a dental professional to perform dental implants. 

Despite the advancement in dental care, millions of Americans still suffer tooth loss- mostly due to tooth decay, gum disease or traumatic injury.  For many years, the only treatment options available to

The most common claim I have handled over the years is the “falls resulting in fractures.” During my years, I have seen an increase in the number of falls. I believe the increase is due to chronic understaffing. When a resident is admitted to a nursing home, there are fall risk assessments and orders made based on fall risk. For example, a resident may require a two people to assist when the resident has to use the bathroom or a resident may need a hoyer lift to get out of bed. Unfortunately, there are nursing homes that are understaffed and consequently a nurse’s aide is trying to do the job which requires 2 people. I have seen situations where the nurse’s aide dropped a resident or a resident rolled out of bed because orders were not followed.
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Accidents involving elevators are a rare occurrence. According to ConsumerWatch.com, there are about 18 billion passenger trips on elevators. Of these 18 billion passengers’ trips, there are about 27 deaths annually according to estimates from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Injuries and deaths are so uncommon that there isn’t much written about them in medical literature. In fact, people who service and maintain elevators are more likely to be injured. A report from the Occupational Health and Safety supports this fact. According to the report, the people who install and maintain elevators may become injured in a variety of ways, including, “falls, electrical shocks, muscle strains and other injuries related to lockout/tagout, confined spaces, scaffolds, cranes, rigging, hoisting and heavy equipment.”
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