Photo of Carin A. O'Donnell

Carin A. O’Donnell is a Shareholder and member of Stark & Stark’s Accident & Personal Injury and Construction Injury Groups where she concentrates her practice in wrongful death and catastrophic injury litigation. Ms. O’Donnell is a trial attorney who has successfully litigated personal injury matters resulting in multiple verdicts exceeding a million dollars. Her extensive trial experience has helped her win cases for plaintiffs in counties that typically favor defense verdicts. As a result, her cases have been featured in local papers, radio shows and legal publications.

Being in a family of construction workers, the COVID-19 crisis has hit hard. My family members, like yours are out of work, seeking unemployment, or their businesses are prevented from thriving.

With COVID-19 not yet reaching its peak, several Construction businesses have been required to halt residential and commercial construction due to the Commonwealth’s ordered shut down. This has left many employees, construction companies, and suppliers struggling to survive. While the City of Philadelphia has taken measures, such as online permitting, in an attempt to allow payments and work to continue in some circumstances, most construction has been halted. However, in other parts of the country, work continues and employees are being put at risk. Recently in North Carolina, a stand down was orchestrated in an effort to address protection of workers and the community.


Continue Reading COVID-19 and Construction in Philadelphia and Surrounding States

Most people are aware that a dog owner can be sued if his dog bites you. But what if a dog runs up to you, jumps on you, and knocks you down, causing injury? That scenario highlights the difference between injuries from dog bites and injuries that occur from a dog attack or confrontation.

Pennsylvania law treats dog attacks differently depending on whether the dog is a “dangerous dog” and whether the bite caused severe injury or death. A “dangerous dog” is defined as one that has:

  1. Inflicted severe injury on a human being without provocation on public or private property.
  2. Killed or inflicted severe injury on a domestic animal, dog, or cat without provocation while off the owner’s property.
  3. Attacked a human being without provocation.
  4. Been used in the commission of a crime.

And the dog has either or both of the following:

  1. A history of attacking human beings and/or domestic animals, dogs, or cats without provocation.
  2. A propensity to attack human beings and/or domestic animals, dogs, or cats without provocation.


Continue Reading Knocked Down and Injured by a Dog – Now What?

Industry stakeholders, contractors, and industry associations recently provided testimony at an OSHA public hearing regarding reinforcing steel and post-tensioning standards. As reported by The Ironworker, the rationale for pursuing new standards is:

  • The current OSHA standard written in 1971 is antiquated and only contains three references specifically pertaining to reinforcing steel and two for

During the past year the Ironworkers ZERO Fatality-Incident Campaign commissioned by General President Eric Dean, and the IMPACT board of trustees, concentrated on training and communication measures to the improve safety for ironworkers while on the job. The overarching goal of the campaign is to improve safety skills and knowledge.

Continue Reading Ironworkers ZERO Fatality-Incident Campaign

Most people don’t understand that when you get hurt at work, you not only have the potential for a workers’ compensation claim, but also a third party negligence claim. You might wonder, what exactly is the difference between the two?

A workers’ compensation claim is against your employer and is intended to recover partial wage benefits and payment of medical bills from your work related injury, if you are injured in the course and scope of your employment. A third party claim, on the other hand, is against someone other than your employer and is intended to recover pain and suffering, lost wages, future wages, and other damages. Because the law does not allow you to sue your employer for negligence, workers compensation is your only remedy against your employer. As a result, you must look to third party to recover your other losses.

For example, let’s assume you are working at a construction site and you fall through a hole in the floor. As a result of this fall, you are catastrophically injured. The hole was created by Company A, who did not secure, cover, or provide warning for the hole. You work for Company B. In this type of case, you would be eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits from Company B and pursue a third party negligence case against Company A for failing to secure, cover, or provide warning for the hole.


Continue Reading Juggling Workers’ Compensation & Third Party/Negligence Cases: You Need Someone Who Can Do Both

With the arrival of the New Year, there are many pledges or resolutions being made. Some pledges include the promises by nursing homes to give better quality care to its residents. While made with good intentions, these promises may actually be prompted as a result of the “Special Focus Facility Initiative” program conducted by the

When a family member or loved one is killed as a result of the negligence of another person, it can be understandably difficult to determine what next steps you need to take. In cases such as these, the terms “wrongful death” and “survival” claims are typically discussed. These types of claims aim to recover damages for the families of the deceased. Although both terms are frequently referenced together, they are actually very separate and distinct terms. For this reason, it is extremely important that families understand what each means.

A wrongful death claim is an action to recover damages for the death of an individual. In addition, money may also be recovered for reasonable hospital, nursing, medical, and funeral expenses, as well any expenses resulting from the administration necessitated by the reason(s) of death. The money recovered in a wrongful death claim will only go to either the spouse, child(ren), or parents of the deceased, and only as beneficiaries. Each of these individuals is entitled to money in accordance with intestacy laws. Intestacy is a legal term that refers to any individual who has died without a Will in place. As a result, money obtained from a wrongful death claim is distributed by these laws, so even if there is a Will prior to death, that will not affect or control how this money is distributed amongst family members.


Continue Reading Understanding Wrongful Death & Survival Claims