Photo of Carin A. O'Donnell

Carin A. O’Donnell is a Shareholder and member of Stark & Stark’s Accident & Personal Injury and Construction Injury Groups where she concentrates her practice in wrongful death and catastrophic injury litigation. Ms. O’Donnell is a trial attorney who has successfully litigated personal injury matters resulting in multiple verdicts exceeding a million dollars. Her extensive trial experience has helped her win cases for plaintiffs in counties that typically favor defense verdicts. As a result, her cases have been featured in local papers, radio shows and legal publications.

As a personal injury attorney with a focus on injured workers and employees, I represent many individuals who are injured by machine accidents.

Common causes of machine accidents

More often than not, machine accidents are caused by either a lack of guards, barriers, and gates or by the removal of safety devices. These accidents can lead to amputations or even fatal injuries. While employers must do their due diligence by keeping their workers safe, many times the injuries are caused by faulty or incomplete equipment in the workplace.


Continue Reading Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Seeks Updated Safety Standards Regarding Faulty Equipment in the Workplace

Every year, the Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspection updates contractors and subcontractors on the requirements needed to operate in Philadelphia. While some requirements have been longstanding, workers and contractors should be aware and mindful of what is required of them to be permitted to perform construction and to help keep workers safe. To operate construction services in Philadelphia, one set of rules a contractor must follow is the Contractor Operational requirements. These are codes of conduct for both contractors and subcontractors which require, but are not limited to: a valid license, necessary operating permits, prohibition on selling or transferring licenses and permits, and maintaining demographic information at a job site such as addresses and contact numbers for key personnel and companies.

Continue Reading The Importance of Complying With the 2021 Philadelphia Construction Requirements

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). Please find several frequently asked questions regarding sexual abuse/assault, along with answers below.

If you are survivor of sexual abuse, do you have a viable civil claim?

Unfortunately, not all sexual abuse claims are viable civil cases. For an individual to have a viable civil sexual abuse claim, it is critical that there is a viable defendant who has the ability to compensate the victim for their injuries (mental and physical).


Continue Reading Frequently Asked Questions About Sexual Abuse Cases

In our high-tech world of Snapchat, Groupme and text messaging, individuals are often sharing intimate photos or videos with their romantic partners via cellphones. Additionally, with the prevalence of in-home security cameras, webcams, and cellphone video technology, it is easier than ever for an individual to record intimate interactions without their partner’s consent or knowledge. Even when consent is provided by both parties for the recording of such intimate interaction, there usually is not consent to share and distribute such recordings with others outside of the relationship.

Continue Reading Victims of Unlawful Dissemination of Intimate Images Can Seek Justice

Being in a family of construction workers, the COVID-19 crisis has hit hard. My family members, like yours are out of work, seeking unemployment, or their businesses are prevented from thriving.

With COVID-19 not yet reaching its peak, several Construction businesses have been required to halt residential and commercial construction due to the Commonwealth’s ordered shut down. This has left many employees, construction companies, and suppliers struggling to survive. While the City of Philadelphia has taken measures, such as online permitting, in an attempt to allow payments and work to continue in some circumstances, most construction has been halted. However, in other parts of the country, work continues and employees are being put at risk. Recently in North Carolina, a stand down was orchestrated in an effort to address protection of workers and the community.


Continue Reading COVID-19 and Construction in Philadelphia and Surrounding States

All too often society’s most vulnerable citizens – our youth – are abused by the very people who are responsible for their care.

In 2017, over 3,000 children in Pennsylvania were placed in out-of-home juvenile delinquent residential facilities, including group homes. Surveys conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice in a study show the disturbing trend that sexual abuse in these facilities is increasing nationwide.


Continue Reading Sexual Abuse in Pennsylvania

Most people are aware that a dog owner can be sued if his dog bites you. But what if a dog runs up to you, jumps on you, and knocks you down, causing injury? That scenario highlights the difference between injuries from dog bites and injuries that occur from a dog attack or confrontation.

Pennsylvania law treats dog attacks differently depending on whether the dog is a “dangerous dog” and whether the bite caused severe injury or death. A “dangerous dog” is defined as one that has:

  1. Inflicted severe injury on a human being without provocation on public or private property.
  2. Killed or inflicted severe injury on a domestic animal, dog, or cat without provocation while off the owner’s property.
  3. Attacked a human being without provocation.
  4. Been used in the commission of a crime.

And the dog has either or both of the following:

  1. A history of attacking human beings and/or domestic animals, dogs, or cats without provocation.
  2. A propensity to attack human beings and/or domestic animals, dogs, or cats without provocation.


Continue Reading Knocked Down and Injured by a Dog – Now What?

Industry stakeholders, contractors, and industry associations recently provided testimony at an OSHA public hearing regarding reinforcing steel and post-tensioning standards. As reported by The Ironworker, the rationale for pursuing new standards is:

  • The current OSHA standard written in 1971 is antiquated and only contains three references specifically pertaining to reinforcing steel and two for