Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Act was enacted in May 2016 (the “Act”). Under the Act, patients with serious medical conditions, such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and severe chronic or intractable pain, are authorized to use medical marijuana to treat their condition after obtaining a certification from a physician and an identification card issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Health. Medical marijuana may only be issued to an individual or an individual’s caregiver who has received the certification and identification card. Medical marijuana may not be smoked and may only be dispensed in certain enumerated forms.

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In Pennsylvania, residential and commercial lease agreements are governed not only by the terms of the lease itself, but also by the Landlord and Tenant Act of 1951, 68 P.S. §§ 250.101, et. seq.

When a lease term ends, the landlord is required to provide a tenant with a list of damages caused to the premises within thirty days of the termination of the lease or repossession of the property.

In addition, the landlord must return any escrow monies held under the lease within that time period. If the landlord deducts any funds to pay for alleged damages to the premises, then the landlord must return the difference in the balance of the escrow funds to the tenant.


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Cyber security has become a growing concern for individuals and businesses across the nation. Undoubtedly, you’ve heard about breaches at Target, Wal-Mart, J.P. Morgan Chase, Home Depot, Apple, and Neiman Marcus. Hundreds of thousands of people had their names, social security numbers, financial information, and other sensitive data stolen and used unlawfully.

Theft of consumer information via the internet happens every day from any number of data or network systems to all types of people. It’s not just individuals or big box stores that are targeted. Cyber-attacks are directed at various organizations that keep clients’ and customers’ personal information on record. Hackers will look to small businesses, and even to a person’s home management company or homeowners’ association, to access their sensitive personal and financial information.


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The Pennsylvania Legislature recently enacted legislation which amends portions of the Mechanics’ Lien Law, 49 P.S. § 1101, et. seq. (“MLL”), and provides a statutory fix to the Kessler decision.

The Superior Court of Pennsylvania’s decision in Commerce Bank/Harrisburg, N.A. v. Kessler, issued in May 2012, caused a fundamental change in the industry’s understanding

A recent case decided by the District of Columbia Court of Appeals has sent shockwaves through the Mortgage Lending Industry and given hope to Condominium Associations and Homeowners Associations at the same time. The issue in Chase Plaza Condominium Association, Inc. v. JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A., concerned the statutory “super-priority” lien established in

Of paramount importance to determining the deadline to file a Mechanics’ Lien Claim is the date of last work performed by the prospective claimant. A lien claim must be filed no later than six months after the claimant’s date of last work – lien claims filed after six months are time barred and will be stricken by any Court. As a result, the question of what constitutes “work” within the Law’s definition of “last work” has been the subject of much litigation, but without much guidance in the form of binding precedents from Pennsylvania’s Appellate Courts.
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This blog is part of an ongoing series discussing the Pennsylvania Mechanics’ Lien Law. For more information on Mechanics’ Liens in Pennsylvania, click here.

For decades in Pennsylvania, there was a lack of clarity as to when Mechanics’ Lien Claim rights attached to a project where the work and materials provided were for the

This blog is part of an ongoing series discussing the Pennsylvania Mechanics’ Lien Law. For more information on Mechanics’ Liens in Pennsylvania, click here.

For decades, Mechanics Lien Claims filed under the Pennsylvania Mechanics’ Lien Law of 1963 were reviewed scrupulously by the courts. Because Mechanics’ Lien Claims were considered “creatures of statute” in